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HP SPECTRE 13 REVIEW: BATTERY LIFE
The other risky part of the HP Spectre 13 is battery life. While Core i7 CULV-series laptops are efficient, they can still draw more power than a Core M machine.
Sure enough, the Spectre 13's stamina is good but not standard-setting. When used out and about as a work computer, for writing and browsing, we found it lasts for six and a half hours. That’s not quite enough for a day's work for most people, and is a slightly worse than some of Asus’s cheaper ZenBook rivals.
Playing back a locally-stored video at 120cd/m screen brightness, the HP Spectre 13 lasts eight hours 55 minutes. This is almost dead-on HP’s claims, although we have noticed that battery level can drop much quicker as soon as it’s under any sort of significant strain. If you’re just browsing and start to hear a louder fan whir, it is time to head to the Task Manager to see what’s up or you won’t see anything like this performance.
Battery life is not one of the Spectre 13’s strongest suits, but that’s not surprise given its frame and CPU.

The HP Spectre 13 is desperate to appear a laptop of the future, and that comes with substantial pros and cons. Its supreme portability is quite wonderful, and while its design may polarise, it certainly is fancy. There's substance too, with a surprisingly powerful CPU for a laptop this thin and solid build in the keyboard and trackpad. Its message is a little confused, though. The processor courts enthusiasts, but that's exactly who's likely to be most annoyed by the lack of memory card slot and a traditional USB port. There's an audience for the Spectre 13, but if you've not signed-up to a wireless way of working yet you may want to think twice.
If you need to give your laptop fresh start, we'll tell you how to factory reset a laptop or tablet. Here's how to reset a Windows 10 PC and also Windows 7 or Windows 8.
Restoring your laptop to the state it came out of the factory can be handy for a number of different reasons. Perhaps you're having problems with your laptop's performance, a virus or you simply want to sell it on and remove all your programs, files, passwords and other sensitive information. In these situations, a recovery partition is your friend. See also: How to speed up a computer.
It's a little more difficult than a smartphone or a tablet but we'll show you how to do it step by step.

Most laptops don't come with recovery discs any more but if yours does then this is still a fairly easy way of performing a factory reset. If you didn't get any discs in the box, then there's a good chance your laptop has a recovery partition.
This is a hidden part of the hard drive which safely stores a complete copy of Windows, drivers and extra programs. You can use it return your laptop to the exact state it was in the first day you had it - and it will perform just the same, too. This guide will show you how to access and use the recovery partitions to factory reset your laptop.Please bear in mind that the process will vary between different brands of laptops and even different models. The recovery software will be called various names for each brand of laptop, along the lines of 'recovery manager'. We've done our best to put together a 'one size fits all' guide.

In Windows 10 the process is a lot easier with a built-in tool for resetting a PC. Open the Start menu and select Settings (the cog wheel). Now type 'reset' in the search bar and select 'Reset this PC' on the left when th results appear.
It's under the Recvory section of Update & Security and you can now hit 'Get started' to begin the process. During this you can select if you would like to keep filles or do a full reset. In general this will work for Windows 7 and previous versions but Windows 8 laptops will typically have a recovery application which is launched from within Windows so check your app menu. Backup any data which you wish to keep before performing a factory reset. You will probably want to copy everything from your user folders, including documents, photos, music and videos. The factory reset will delete all these along with any programs you've installed since you got your laptop.

If these keys don't work then look out for a message in the screen during startup which might indicate how to start the recovery process. You might need to check your recovery partition is enabled in the BIOS. It's also possible your laptop might not have a recovery partition (or it may have been deleted) so we're making no guarantees here. You might need to contact your manufacturer. You should see instructions on the screen explaining how to proceed. Different manufacturers use different software to restore the 'disk image' from the recovery partition, so we can't provide specific guidance. However, the process is almost always automatic once you've confirmed you definitely want to proceed, so it might be a case of waiting for 30 minutes for the job to happen in one go, but some systems restore Windows first, and then install drivers and programs automatically when Windows first boots. If that's the case, don't try to do anything until you see a message saying the restore has finished.
Windows 8 was a radically different operating system, but with Windows 10 it brings back the legacy look and feel of Windows 7, whilst maintaining a fast performance. Here's our comparison of Windows 7 vs Windows 10.
For many, Windows 7 has been the benchmark against which to judge all others. Considering how confusing and ill thought out Windows 8's interface was (and still is in many ways), it's no surprise that many are skeptical of the Windows 10 upgrade.
Well we have good news. Microsoft is back on form, with Windows 10 taking the best bits of Windows 7 and Windows 8 as well as adding some welcome new features.
Update 2 August: The free upgrade period has ended, where Windows 10 now costs £99.99 for the Home Edition and £189.99 for the Pro version.

Windows 7 has a straightforward, well-designed interface that is very familiar to Windows users. Click on the Start Menu button in the bottom left corner and you can navigate your PC. When the minds behind Windows 8 decided to supplant this with a touch-focussed approach, it soon become apparent that not many users wanted big icons, charm bars, and menus swiping in from up, down, left and right.
In fact many people we talked to used tools like Classic Shell and Start8 to bypass this completely and revert to the Desktop mode with its simple Start Menu. Windows 10 doesn’t make the same mistake. The Start Menu returns from its brief hiatus, but now it’s been beefed with some useful new features. Live tiles from Windows 8 are now included on the right side of the menu, although if you’d prefer not to have these then they are easily removed.

Alternatively, there is also the option to run the Start Menu in fullscreen mode. The left side of the menu brings a sense of continuity with Windows 7 in that it contains options for regularly used apps, File explorer, Settings, and a Search bar.
Now with the Anniversary Update in Windows 10, live-tiles now take you to what is being displayed, rather than to the app's home page. More importantly, the 'All Apps' list is now the default view when opening the Start Menu, meaning a removal of the extra option; this also changes the positioning of the power button, which now resides in the left-hand corner. This all adds to a better experience over Windows 7 through the Start Menu.
One area where the changes between the two systems are obvious is in search. In Windows 10 the Search bar not only looks for folders, apps, and files on your PC, but is also linked to the Windows Store and your browser so it can seach the web right from your desktop.

No need to navigate to the right tab when you want to look something up, just hit the Windows key, start typing, and your search results will be displayed in a browser window. In addition to this there’s also the rather impressive addition of Microsoft’s personal assistant Cortana. Windows phone owners will already be versed in the ways of Cortana, the virtual assistant to whom you can issue voice commands. Of course Google Now and Apple’s own Siri perform similar duties, but in Windows 10 Cortana has become an integral part of the desktop OS.
Clicking on the Search area in the Taskbar opens the Cortana interface and allows you ask her various questions, such as search queries, your upcoming appointments, the weather, directions to the nearest coffee shop is, and many others. She can also schedule appointments, take dictated notes, add tasks and reminders, plus play music on your PC.

Microsoft also revealed that it is launching Cortana apps for iOS and Android, which hopefully means the notebook that she uses to remember all of your requests will also work on those platforms. This could make Cortana an incredibly useful way to organise your life across all your devices, whatever they may be, and all from your Windows 10 desktop.
Now with the Anniversary Update in Windows 10, Cortana has taken even greater emphasis in operating system. You can now use voice activation to set reminders directly from the lock screen and use Cortana to provide you with more information within web-based searches. Note: Unfortunately, Microsoft has decided to forcefully keep Cortana-based searches. You can disable the option, but you won't be able to fully remove it as you were able to prior to the Anniversary Update.
See also: How to use Cortana in Windows 10.

While it’s technically possible to have virtual desktops in Windows 7, via the Desktops v2.0 software available on the Windows Sysinternals site, Windows 10 has the feature included directly in the operating system. Simply click on the Task view icon located in the Taskbar (or use the WIN+Tab key combination) and you’ll be able to quickly add a virtual desktop by clicking on the Plus sign in the bottom right corner.
Now you can easily drag open applications onto the new workspace and declutter your various tasks. Navigating between them is easy, and as they all share the same data any changes you make will be universal. Also see: How to use Virtual Desktops in Windows 10